HIST 211 WORLD CIVILIZATIONS: ORIGINS TO 1500 (3)

Three hours lecture per week

This survey examines world civilizations from the Neolithic era to the European colonization of the Western Hemisphere. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the development and growth of religions, commerce, and other cultural institutions.

GenEd: D

 

HIST 212 WORLD CIVILIZATIONS: SINCE 1500 (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

This survey examines world civilizations from both regional and global perspectives. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the development and growth of religions, commerce, and other cultural institutions.

GenEd: D

 

HIST 270 THE UNITED STATES TO 1877 (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Survey of the political, social, economic as well as cultural institutions of the United States from the pre-colonial era to reconstruction. Meets Title V U.S. History and Constitution requirement.

 

HIST 271 THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1877 (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Survey of the political, social, economic as well as cultural institutions of the United States from reconstruction to the present. Meets Title V U.S History and Constitution requirement.

 

HIST 272 CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF THE U.S. (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the origins of American constitutional thought and practice, the framing and adoption of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, the establishment of the U.S. Supreme Court and of its power of judicial review. Topics include: major decisions by the Supreme Court in history and their impacts on society, and California state constitution and government. Meets Title V U.S. History and Constitution Requirement.

 

HIST 275 THE UNITED STATES TO 1900 (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

This course is specially designed for students in the Teaching and Learning Option of the of Liberal Studies Program. Examines the history of the United States from the colonial origins to the emergence of a modern industrial system. Emphasis is given to the major social, political, and cultural events during the period from the early 1600s to 1900, such as the encounters between Native Americans and European explorers, the growth of English colonies, the American Revolution, the transformation of American society after Independence, slavery, abolition, the Civil War, and the development of mass immigration and industrialization. Meets Title V U.S. History and Constitution Requirement.

 

HIST 280 THE HISTORIAN'S CRAFT (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing or consent of the instructor

This is a survey course on the writing of history. Utilizes and analyzes library resources, oral interviews, and other material in the writing of history.

GenEd: D

 

HIST 310 HISTORY OF THE MEDITERRANEAN (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the history of the Mediterranean over the last 3000 years. Special attention will be paid to the Greco-Roman heritage, the impact of Christianity and Islam, the rise of Italian merchants, and the tangle between Spain and the Ottoman Empire over the control of the sea.

 

HIST 319 EUROPEAN HISTORY, 1871-1945 (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the development of European history from the unification of Germany to the end of the Second World War. Special attention will be paid to the development of powerful ideologies (e.g., communism, fascism), socio-economic change, and imperial expansion.

 

HIST 320 EUROPEAN HISTORY, 1945-PRESENT (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the development of European history to the present day. Special attention will be paid to the reconstruction of the continent following the war, the implications of the cold war and the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the emergence of the European Union.

 

HIST 331 NARRATIVES OF THE WORKING CLASS (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the lives of working people using various thematic approaches and disiplinary methodoligies. Matherials included literature, film, and case studies.

Same as ECON 331, ENGL 331, SOC 331, POLS 331

GenEd: C2,D,Interdisciplinary

 

HIST 333 HISTORY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHICANA/O ART (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

An exploration of the Southern California Chicano/a culture focusing on the genesis, vitality and diversity represented in the painting, sculpture and artistic traditions of Mexican American artists. Historical movements, politics, cultural trends and Mexican folklore underlying the development of this dynamic style of art will be investigated within a variety of contexts.

Same as ART 333

GenEd: C3B,D,Interdisciplinary

 

HIST 334 NARRATIVES OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA (3) [top]

Three hours lecture/discussion per week

Ours is a region made up of many cultures which produce the one we call “Southern California.” In this class we will take a historical approach to study of the narratives oral, written, and filmed of Southern California. Course work may also include obtaining oral histories and compiling them.

Same as ENGL 334

GenEd: C2, D, Interdisciplinary

 

HIST 335 AMERICAN ETHNIC IMAGES IN NOVELS, FILM AND ART (3) [top]

Three hours lecture/discussion per week

Examines the portrayal of ethnic groups from an interdisciplinary perspective that includes, but is not limited to, the literary, historical, and anthropological modes of analysis. The course highlights the ways in which artistic works have shaped the intellectual landscape of the United States as they relate to ethnic peoples.

Same as ART 335, ENGL 335

GenEd: C2,C3B,Interdisciplinary

 

HIST 338 THEATRE IN HISTORY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

A survey of the history of theatrical productions. Includes formal productions and performances as well as other types of theatre or dramatization such as political posturing, i.e. Caesar's entrance into Rome in historical reality as well as performed or recorded later in theatre, music, and history.

Same as PA 338

GenEd: C1,D,Interdisciplinary

 

HIST 340 HISTORY AND PSYCHOLOGY OF NAZI GERMANY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: Upper Division standing

Examines the historical and psychological roots of the Nazi movement in Germany. Areas covered will include the mass psychology of fascism, the psychopathology of Nazi leaders, and the psychological impact of the holocaust.

Same as PSY 340

GenEd: D,E,Interdisciplinary

 

HIST 349 HISTORY OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS IN NORTH AMERICA (3) [top]

Three hours of lecture per week

Examines the growth and development of the economies of North America since colonial times. Addresses social, ethical, economic and management issues during the development of Canada, the United States, and Mexico. Analyzes the business principles underlying the growth and development of the economies.

Same as ECON 349, BUS 349

GenEd: D,Interdisciplinary

 

HIST 350 CHICANO HISTORY AND CULTURE (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the settlement and culture of Mexicanos in the United States to the present. Particular attention is given to the relationship of Mexicanos to the political and economic institutions of the United States.

 

HIST 365 THEMES IN WORLD HISTORY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Explores the major trends in global approaches to history. These include anthropological, diaspora, environmental, and world systems approaches.

GenEd: D

 

HIST 366 OCEANS OF WORLD HISTORY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Discusses the main approaches to world history through the lens of the earth's three major oceans: Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific.

 

HIST 367 ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the historical interaction between humans and their environment. Special attention will be paid to the transformations of environments in the Americas and Europe.

 

HIST 369 CALIFORNIA HISTORY AND CULTURE (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the cultural and institutional development of California prior to the 16th century and since.

 

HIST 372 UNITED STATES INDUSTRIALIZATION AND PROGRESSIVISM (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the nation's geographic and industrial expansion. Social and political problems up to the end of WWI will also be examined.

 

HIST 373 AMERICAN LABOR HISTORY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

This is an in-depth study of the individual, group, and organized experience of the American working people from colonial time to the twentieth century.

 

HIST 374 UNITED STATES SINCE 1945 (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the cultural, social, and political transformation of the nation after World War II. Among the various topics of the course, specific attention is given to how international affairs influenced domestic life and society.

 

HIST 380 HISTORY OF THE PACIFIC ISLANDS (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the history of the Pacific from human settlement to the present. Special attention will be paid to cross-cultural encounters, religious conversion, imperialism, and post-colonial realities in the region. The course employs interdisciplinary methods borrowed from anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics.

 

HIST 391 TRADITIONAL CHINA (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

This course studies the social, political, economic, and cultural traditions in China from ancient times to the end of the Ming Dynasty.

 

HIST 392 MODERN CHINA (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

This course explores the social, political, economic, and cultural changes in China from to the rise of the Ch'ing Dynasty to 1949.

 

HIST 393 CONTEMPORARY CHINA (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

This course examines the social, political, economic, and cultural developments in China since 1949.

 

HIST 394 TRADITIONAL JAPAN (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

This course studies the social, political, economic, and cultural traditions in Japan from ancient times to the fall of the Tokugawa regime.

 

HIST 395 MODERN JAPAN (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

This course studies the social, political, economic, and cultural changes in Japan from the Meiji Restoration to the present.

 

HIST 396 EAST ASIA: THEN AND NOW (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

This course examines of the social, political, economic, and cultural foundations in China, Korea, and Japan. Emphasis is given to the profound political, economic, and other transformations taking place in these countries in the twentieth century.

 

HIST 401 UNITED STATES IMMIGRATION HISTORY, 1840-1945 (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the experiences and contributions of immigrant groups in the United States. Constitutional, political, and social considerations of United States immigration history frame the content study of this course.

 

HIST 402 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHICANO/A HISTORY AND CULTURE (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the cultural, economic, political, and social experience of Mexicanos of the region from the U.S conquest to the 1990s. Particular attention is given to the interactions of this community with other ethnic and racial groups. Although designed within the disciplinary framework of history, the course utilizes literature, film, and art as mediums of learning about the culture and history of Chicano/as.

GenEd: D

 

HIST 403 THE AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL TRADITION (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

This course explores American thought from Puritanism, transcendentalism, and pragmatism to contemporary trends represented in thinkers from Richard Mather, Jonathan Edwards, Ralph Emerson, William James, and John Dewey to Reinhold Hiebuhr. It also addresses those dissenting voices resonantly expressed in American life from Ann Hutchinson, Roger Williams, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Susan B. Anthony, and W. E. B. Du Bois to Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

HIST 412 LAW AND SOCIETY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: ENGL 330

This course investigates a wide range of issues including, but not limited to, the origins of the law in classical civilizations, the interplays between/among law, religion, government, and morality, evolutions of diverse legal systems in different societies and traditions, legal and ethical challenges of modern sciences, the rule of law in an international environment, and the debate over the extent and limits of the laws in coping with social and technological problems of modern life.

GenEd: D

 

HIST 413 WORLD RELIGIONS AND CLASSICAL PHILOSOPHY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: ENGL 330

This course studies and compares some major religions and philosophical schools in the ancient world. It examines how different societies and peoples have formed their basic assumptions concerning the universe, faith, human nature and society, and how those fundamental assumptions have affected their chosen modes of thinking, ways of life, organizations of society, forms of government, and approaches to knowledge.

GenEd: D

 

HIST 414 WOMEN IN HISTORY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

This course examines the role of women and gender in human experience. Topics may vary. They include, but are not limited to, gender and work, gender and religion, gender in literature, gender and race, gender and sexuality, gender and family, and gender and social change.

 

HIST 415 SOCIETY AND RADICALISM (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

This course studies the emergence of different styles of protests and radicalism in the modern world. Topics include, but are not limited to, radical thinkers, theories, philosophies, organizations, strategies, movements, as well as the roles and influences they had in society.

 

HIST 420 HISTORY OF MEXICO (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the social and political history of Mexico from the period of European contact to the present. The modern phase of Mexico's history is examined in relation to the overall development of North America.

 

HIST 421 REVOLUTIONARY MEXICO, 1876-1930 (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Evaluates the social and political causes and consequences of the Mexican Revolution. Particular attention is also given to the influence and intervention of the United States of America in Mexico's economic and domestic affairs.

 

HIST 430 TRADITION AND TRANSFORMATION: LITERATURE, HISTORY, AND CULTURAL CHANGE (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: ENGL 103 or ENGL 105 or HIST 280 or consent of the instructor

Bringing literature and history together, this course exposes students to a diverse range of work in art, literature, films, and history. It cultivates the students' intellectual understanding of the topic from both a cross-disciplinary and a cross-cultural perspective. It emphasizes reading, writing, analytical skills, and communication skills. Topics and themes may vary under the same title. Repeatable.

Same as ENGL 430

GenEd: C3B,D,Interdisciplinary

 

HIST 436 PSYCHOLOGY AND HISTORY OF EAST ASIAN WARRIOR CULTURES (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or consent of the instructor

Examines the psychological and historical roots of warrior cultures in East Asia. Characteristics such as duty, enlightenment, honor, loyalty, and discipline will be examined in the context of the individual and group psychology of warrior cultures throughout history. Psychological and historical conceptions of violence, aggression, and strategy will also be explored. Students will be encouraged to relate values derived from Asian warrior cultures to their own lives, while reflecting on the applicability of these ideas to modern life.

Same as PSY 436

GenEd: D,E,Interdisciplinary

 

HIST 442 THE AFRICAN DIASPORA (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the dispersal of Africans to other continents over the last two thousand years. Special attention will be paid to the African slave trade, identity formation, and nationalism. The course employs interdisciplinary methods borrowed from anthropology, art history, linguistics, and literature.

Same as ANTH 442

GenEd: D,Interdisciplinary

 

HIST 470 PEOPLE AND EVERYDAY LIFE IN EARLY AMERICA (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

The course focuses on those ordinary men and women whose daily works and activities made what American society was. It covers the time span from the 1600s to the early 1800s; topics include, but not limited to, popular religion, work ethics and labor systems, family and marriage, festivities, leisure, and games, law and order, mass-control policies on crime and punishment, trades and craftsmanship, farming and industries, issues of gender, race, and ethnicities, early popular unrest, collective actions, and protests.

 

HIST 490 SPECIAL TOPICS (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Investigates a prominent topic of historical interest. Topics vary by semester. Repeatable by topic.

 

HIST 491 HISTORIOGRAPHY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: HIST 280, Senior Standing, or consent of the instructor

This course surveys major historians and their theoretical and methodological approaches to the discipline from the nineteenth century to the present day. The course is designed to update students to the most influential theories in the study of history. Included in this survey are theoretical approaches based on the writings of Braudel, Foucault, Freud, and Marx.

 

HIST 492 INTERNSHIP/SERVICE LEARNING (1-3) [top]

Provides students with 'hands-on' experience and/or Service Learning opportunities in the historical field.

Student Option: Graded or CR/NC

 

HIST 494 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (1-3) [top]

Prerequisite: Junior Standing and Consent of the Instructor

Independent reading and/or research project under the direction of a faculty member. Repeatable.

Student Option: Graded or CR/NC

 

HIST 497 DIRECTED STUDIES (1-3) [top]

Prerequisite: Junior Standing and consent of the instructor

Exploring an important historical topic under the direction of a faculty member. Significant written reports expected. Topics vary and repeatable.

Student Option: Graded or CR/NC

 

HIST 499 CAPSTONE IN HISTORY (1-3) [top]

Under the supervision of a faculty advisor, students complete a project approved by the faculty advisor which will integrate prior course work with the general expectations of the Program. Completed projects may be disseminated to the campus community.

Student Option: Graded or CR/NC