Detail of patio tile and ironwork

2007-2008 University Catalog

Biology

BIOL 100 EXPLORING THE LIVING WORLD (4)

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

An overview of biology from the molecular to the ecosystem level. Topics include the origin, diversity and evolution of life, ecology of populations and communities, the structure and function of plant and animal organ systems, biological molecules, cellular structure/function, genetics and cell division. No credit given toward the major in Biology. A lab fee is required.

GenEd: B2

BIOL 170 FOUNDATIONS OF LIFE SCIENCE (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

This course meets the needs of prospective elementary school teachers. The course will cover a broad spectrum of topics including introduction to scientific inquiry with living organisms, physiology, cell biology, genetics, evolution and ecology. Current issues in biology will also be considered. The laboratories will focus on hands-on activities particularly relevant to elementary school students. No credit given toward the major in Biology. A lab fee is required.

GenEd: B2

BIOL 200 PRINCIPLES OF ORGANISMAL AND POPULATION BIOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

An introduction to organismal biology including the diversity, comparative structure, organ system function, development, phylogeny, taxonomy and systematics of prokaryotes, protists, fungi, plants and animals. Discussion of the principles of evolution including speciation and natural selection, the environmental impact and ecosystem interaction of plants and animals, the behavior of animals, population genetics and population biology. A lab fee is required.

GenEd: B2

BIOL 201 PRINCIPLES OF CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: CHEM 105 or CHEM 121

This course will cover principles of basic chemistry, biological macromolecules, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure and function, homeostasis, metabolism including both respiration and photosynthesis, cell division, signal transduction, Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics including transcription and translation, and a brief introduction to virology and immunology. The philosophy of science, scientific method and experimental design are foundational to the course. A lab fee is required.

GenEd: B2

BIOL 203 QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR BIOLOGY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisites: A passing score on the Entry Level Mathematics Exam (ELM) or MATH 105 or equivalent.

This course introduces students in the biological sciences to the quantitative skills and technological tools necessary to evaluate the literature and carry out original research in the discipline. Topics include the principles of biological sampling design, hypothesis generation for biological experiments, collection of observational and experimental data, statistical analysis and interpretation of biological data, and the presentation of results. Laboratories will emphasize microcomputer technology and software applications likely to be encountered in the biological sciences.

GenEd: B3,B4

BIOL 210 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.

Study of gross and microscopic anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include homeostasis, cell structure/function, histology, the skeletal system, the muscular system, the digestive system and the nervous and sensory systems. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 211 HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 210

Study of gross and microscopic anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the integumentary system, the endocrine system, the circulatory system, the immune system, the respiratory system, the urinary system and the reproductive system. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 212 NEUROBIOLOGY & COGNITIVE SCIENCE (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 100 or BIOL 200 or BIOL 201

Principles of brain organization and function underlying behavior. Topics include neuroanatomy and physiology of language, vision, sexual behavior, memory and abnormal behavior.

Same as PSY 212

GenEd: B2,E

BIOL 213 SEX, GERMS AND DISEASES (3) [top]

Three hours lecture/discussion per week

This is a course to introduce biology of sexually transmitted diseases and their impact on society. It covers reproductive system, factors in the spread of diseases, biology and pathogenesis of infectious agents and sexually transmitted diseases caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa. Topics also include impact of current biotechnology in relation to vaccine development, treatment and improved diagnostics of these diseases as well as challenges of these diseases to economy, public health system, individuals, and society at large.

GenEd: B2,E  

BIOL 215 ANIMAL DIVERSITY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

This course will survey the animal kingdom emphasizing the continuity of animal life from simple to more complex body forms and life histories. The diversity of animal life is projected on a framework of basic ecological and evolutionary concepts. Human interactions with animals are explored through management and conservation issues as well as historical examples from the sciences of zoology, classification and evolution. Field trips to selected sites will allow direct examination of local animal diversity. A lab fee is required.

GenEd: B2

BIOL 217 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week

Study of disease-causing microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa and parasites, emphasizing microbial structure, genetics, physiology and pathogenesis of microorganisms. Topics also include interaction between pathogens and their hosts, animal and human diseases, diagnosis, treatment, disease prevention as well as impact of infectious diseases on psychology, society, economy and global affairs. Microbial culturing, identification, differentiation and clinical diagnostic assays will be studied in the laboratory. No credit given toward the biology major.

A lab fee is required.

GenEd: B2

BIOL 260 NUTRITION FOR THERAPEUTICS AND HEALTH (3) [top]

Three hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisites: BIOL 211 and BIOL 217; Admission to clinical nursing program and instructor consent

Provides an overview of the physiological and nutritional basis of health and wellness as related to development, growth, maturation and healthy lifestyles. Focuses on the scientific role of nutrition in health promotion and disease prevention and the therapeutic role of nutrient control in disease states.

Same as NRS 260  

BIOL 300 CELL BIOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 201 with a grade of C or better and CHEM 122

Detailed study of the organization and functioning of cells and cellular organelles at the cellular and molecular levels, emphasizing experimental approaches and structural and functional relationships and their regulation and control. Topics include macromolecules, membrane phenomena, metabolism, enzyme kinetics, and cellular events associated with excitable cells and tissues. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 301 MICROBIOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 201 with a grade of C or better and CHEM 122

Study of microorganisms of the environment, including disease-causing organisms, their structures and functions and their interactions to their host animals and the environment. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 302 GENETICS (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and one hour recitation per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 201 with a grade of C or better and CHEM 122

Principles of classical transmission genetics, population genetics, with an introduction to modern molecular genetics.

BIOL 303 EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 200 and 201

This course will examine principles of biological evolution. Topics include evolutionary genetics, adaptation and natural selection, the fossil record, speciation and macroevolution.

BIOL 304 COMPARATIVE ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 200 and BIOL 201

This course will use a comparative approach to examine physiological principles in a variety of vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Topics include homeostasis, respiration, excretion and physiological adaptations to environmental conditions.

BIOL 306 PATHOPHYSIOLOGY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisites: BIOL 210 and BIOL 211

Corequisites: Generic Student: NRS 220 and NRS 221 Theory is excercised in corequisite courses and content linked. RN-BSN students have no corequisites.

Examines related pathophysiological disruptions to normal system functioning and the impact of these alterations on the individual throughout the life span. Provides rationale for nursing interventions for common health problems involving the integumentary, sensory, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, endocrine, respiratory, hematological, renal/genitourinary, and neurological body systems.

Same as NRS 306

BIOL 310 VERTEBRATE BIOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 200

Vertebrate animals are the most visible animals in most ecosystems. Surveys the diversity of vertebrate evolution, physiology, anatomy, ecology, life history and conservation. Regional and marine vertebrates will be emphasized. Identification of common vertebrate animals, especially local forms. Field trips will be required. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 311 PLANT BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

A general introduction to diverse structures and functions of plants and their relationship to the environment. Identification of local native plants and plant communities, uses of native plants by Native Americans, and human and environmental impacts on native plant communities. Field trips to local sites will be taken. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 312 MARINE BIOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 200

Overview of the complexity of marine life including marine plants and animals and the processes that underlie their distribution and abundance in open oceans, coastal regions, estuaries and wetlands. Topics included diverse interactions of organisms in the intertidal zone, over the continental shelves and in the open oceans. Field trips to local marine environments will be taken. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 313 CONSERVATION BIOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 200

This course explores issues surrounding the conservation of biodiversity. Topics to be covered include: species-, population-, and ecosystem-level issues, biodiversity, extinction, sustained yield, exotic species, and reserve design. Management implications and the ecology of issues are integrated throughout the course. Lab fee required.

Same as ESRM 313

BIOL 315 INTRODUCTION TO BIOPHYSICS (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and two hours activity per week

Prerequisite: PHYS 200

Co-requisite: BIOL 300

This course applies physical methods to the study of biological systems, including transport processes and membrane phenomena, bioelectric phenomena, photosynthetic systems and visual systems. Biophysical methods will include the techniques of patch clamping and optical tweezers, and the measurement of action potentials and evoked responses. There will be an emphasis on modeling and on problem solving, with appropriate mathematics when necessary. The practical activity session will include computer modeling and simulation, and laboratory demonstrations and exercises.

Same as PHYS 315  

BIOL 316 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 200

This course will survey invertebrates from simple, single-celled protists to the most complex of invertebrate animals. Over ninety-five percent of the animals on earth are invertebrates -- animals without backbones. Aspects of the ecology, physiology and evolutionary history of this diverse array of animals will be examined. Human interactions with invertebrates and conservation issues will also be highlighted. Field trips will be required. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 317 PARASITOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 200

This course surveys the diversity of parasitic animals and protists. The parasitic life mode is found in a broad range of animal and protistan phyla, as well as some plant groups. Parasite-host relationships are often tightly co-evolved. Parasites have remarkable and complex adaptations to allow survival and successful reproduction and dispersal. Topics examined will include evolution and life histories of representative parasites, along with medical and epidemiological factors of those that affect humans or domestic animals. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 326 SCIENTIFIC & PROFESSIONAL ETHICS (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Discussion of ethical issues and societal challenges derived from scientific research and professional activities. Examines the sources, fundamental principles, and applications of ethical behavior; the relationship between personal ethics and social responsibility of organizations; and the stakeholder management concept. Applies ethical principles to different types of organizations: business, non-profits, government, health care, science/technology, and other professional groups. Topics also include integrity of scientific research and literature and responsibilities of scientists to society, intellectual property, ethical practices in professional fields, ethical dilemmas in using animal or human subjects in experimentation, gene cloning, animal cloning, gene manipulation, genetic engineering, genetic counseling, and ethical issues of applying biotechnology in agricultural fields.

Same as MGT 326

GenEd: D

BIOL 331 BIOTECHNOLOGY IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Presentation of recent advances in biotechnology and discussion of societal implications. Topics include the processes and methods used to manipulate living organisms, or the substances and products from them, for use in medicine, agriculture, food production, gene therapy, forensics and warfare. The social, ethical and political issues raised by modern biotechnology will be discussed. No credit given toward the biology major.

Same as BUS 331

GenEd: B2,D,Interdisciplinary

BIOL 332 CANCER AND SOCIETY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

The underlying molecular causes of cancer, the impact of environmental and genetic factors on cancer causation and prevention, recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of the disease, and the impact that this disease, which will affect one in three adults, has on society. No credit given toward the biology major.

GenEd: B2,D,Interdisciplinary

BIOL 333 EMERGING PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUES (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Discussion of emerging infectious diseases and other health related issues with global concerns such as AIDS, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted diseases, cardiovascular diseases, animal and bird diseases which may be transmitted to people, food and blood safety issues, environmental public health hazards, immigration and public health issues, potential biological weapons and their impact on human and animal populations in the world and the ecosystem.

GenEd: B2,E,Interdisciplinary

BIOL 334 NATURAL HISTORY OF VENTURA COUNTY (3) [top]

Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

This course will explore the biota and ecosystems of Ventura County. Local ecosystems include chaparral, marine, stream, desert, mountain and island. Topics covered will be classification and diversity of conspicuous regional flora and fauna in the field and laboratory, basic ecological and evolutionary principles of botanical and zoological classification, ecosystem diversity and function. Indigenous cultural and colonial era use of biotic resources, history of scientific exploration of the region, conservation and preservation issues, restoration of natural habitats, adaptation, life history and physiology of resident organisms will also be covered. Field trips will be required.

GenEd: B2,Interdisciplinary

BIOL 335 THE BIOSPHERE (3) [top]

Three hours of lecture per week

The biosphere, the region of the planet where life exists, extends up into the atmosphere as well as down into the deepest ocean trenches. This course will examine the origin, workings, and human influence on earth's biosphere. Topics include evolution of life on earth, atmosphere and climate changes, earth's resources and human impacts.

GenEd: B2,Interdisciplinary

BIOL 342 THE ZOO: CONSERVATION, EDUCATION AND RECREATION (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

An interdisciplinary study of zoos and zoological gardens from scientific, managerial, business, recreational and educational perspectives. Analyzes how these perspectives are linked within zoo practices. The course will include an in-depth case study of a local zoo. Field trips to local zoos will be required.

Same as BUS 342,ECON 342,EDUC 342

GenEd: D,Interdisciplinary

BIOL 345 SCIENCE AND PUBLIC POLICY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the relationship between science, politics, and public policy and prepares students to make informed decisions concerning the societal implications of many rapidly advancing avenues of scientific research.

Same as POLS 345

GenEd: D,Interdisciplinary

BIOL 400 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 300 or BIOL 302 with a grade of C or better

Study of informational macromolecules and how they direct molecular processes in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Topics include structure, function and regulation of the genetic material at the molecular level, gene organization, structures and functions of DNA, RNA and proteins, gene transcription and expression, RNA processing, genomics and proteomics. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 401 BIOTECHNOLOGY AND RECOMBINANT DNA TECHNIQUES (5) [top]

Three hours lecture and six hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 400 with a grade of C or better

Theory and application of molecular biotechnology to problems in medicine, agriculture, forensics, and the environment. This is a laboratory-intensive course emphasizing technical skills in DNA and RNA manipulation, trouble-shooting, experimental design, and data interpretation. Lab fee required.

BIOL 402 TOXICOLOGY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 201 with a grade of C or better and CHEM 122

An in depth study of toxic chemicals and their interactions within the ecosystems. Topics include the origin, fate, chemical and biological detection, and quantification of pollutants and toxins and their impact on organisms at the molecular, biochemical, cellular, physiological, organismal, and community levels of organization. Basic toxicology, genetic toxicology, environmental mutagenesis and the molecular basis of mutation induction will be covered.

BIOL 403 FOUNDATIONS OF STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 300

Study of structure and function of biological macromolecules. Topics include basic structures and properties of macromolecules in biological systems, molecular evolution, conformational changes of macromolecules and their biological implications and techniques used to determine molecular structure of biological macromolecules. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of structural biology in the design and understanding of both biological and chemical pharmaceutics. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 404 PLANT AND ANIMAL TISSUE CULTURE (3) [top]

Two hours lecture and three hours lab per week

Introductory course in the theory and concepts of animal and plant cell and tissue culturing including the fundamentals of tissue culture techniques, subculturing and maintenance of cell lines and stem cell technology. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 405 BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week

Prerequisite: CHEM 318

Emphasizes quantitative engineering aspects of biology including the microbial synthesis of commercial products, environmental biotechnology, and the manufacture of biopharmaceuticals through recombinant microorganisms, transgenic animals, and plants. Consideration will be given to protein isolation and purification, microbial kinetics and energetics, enzyme kinetics, and operation of bioreactors. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 406 EVOLUTIONARY BIOGEOGRAPHY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisites: BIOL 303

Examines the spatial and temporal distribution of plant and animal groups with emphasis on historical, environmental and biological processes governing current patterns of species and habitat geography. Integrates theory and analytical tools from geology, paleontology, ecology, evolution and genetics to study the effects of global change on biodiversity.

BIOL 407 BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 200

Examination of the evolutionary and ecological basis for animal behavior. Topics include: cooperative and competitive interactions, mating systems, reproductive behavior and eusociality .

BIOL 408 NANOBIOTECHNOLOGY (3) [top][top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 400

This course presents the basis of foundation for understanding how macromolecules combine to form the structural and functional units of the intact cell.

BIOL 416 RADIOBIOLOGY AND RADIONUCLIDES (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 300 and PHYS 201

Topics include: nature and effects of ionizing radiation on biomolecular structures and living cells; applied radiobiology and radionuclides; genetic effects of ionizing radiation and methods of protection and dosimetry.

Same as PHYS 416

BIOL 420 CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR IMMUNOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 300 with a grade of C or better and CHEM 122

Study of cellular and molecular aspects of the immune system and its responses against infectious agents and/or environmental insults. Included are development of the organs and cells of the immune system, genetics of the molecules of the immune system and their functions and interactions during an immune response, immunological disorders such as immunodeficiencies, autoimmune diseases, transplantation, and contemporary immunological techniques used in clinical diagnosis and other modern research and development applications. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 421 VIROLOGY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 301 with a grade of C or better and CHEM 122

Study of aspects of molecular structure, genetics, and replication of viruses and other sub-viral agents such as prions and viroids, virus-host interactions, pathogenesis of viral infections, diagnostic virology, and antiviral vaccines and drugs; emphasis on human pathogens.

BIOL 422 MOLECULAR PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 300 with a grade of C or better

Study of principles and methods of plant physiology at the molecular level combined with modern plant technology. Topics include plant tissue and cell culture, genetic engineering and transformation, plant defense, genomics and applications of DNA technology. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 423 CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR NEUROBIOLOGY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 300 with a grade of C or better and CHEM 122

Study of the nervous system at cellular and molecular levels including cellular structure of neurons and their function and interactions, neurotransmitters and their function and regulation, chemical agents and their effects on neuronal cells and normal responses by the cells and the molecules of the nervous system and their responses under adverse conditions.

BIOL 424 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 300 with a grade of C better and CHEM 122

Study of human physiology at both the cellular and organ system levels including neurophysiology, muscle physiology, cardiovascular physiology, respiration, kidney function, hormone function and reproduction.

BIOL 425 HUMAN GENETICS (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 300 and BIOL 302 with grades of C or better and CHEM 122

Basic principles of human inheritance, including the transmission of genetic traits, chromosomal abnormalities and their effects, gene structure and function, pedigree analysis, gene mapping, cytogenetics, mutations and mutagenic agents, cancer genetics, molecular analysis of inherited diseases and genetically controlled phenomena in humans.

BIOL 427 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 300 with a grade of C or better and CHEM 122

This course will use descriptive, experimental and comparative approaches in the study of animal development. Developmental stages including gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and organogenesis will be discussed in a variety of animal phyla. The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying morphogenesis and the evolutionary conservation of developmental mechanisms in various animal phyla will be examined. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 428 BIOLOGY OF CANCER (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 300 with a grade of C or better and CHEM 122

Principles of oncology are examined. Included are mechanisms of oncogenesis at cellular and molecular levels, characteristics of cancer, advantages and disadvantages of various therapies of cancer treatment.

BIOL 431 BIOINFORMATICS (4) [top]

Four hours lecture in the lab per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 302 with a grade of C or better

Navigation and manipulation of biological databases. Topics include: multiple sequence alignment, phylogeny estimation. gene expression profiling, protein structure prediction, and functional genomics. Lab fee is required.

GenEd: B2,B4,Interdisciplinary

 

BIOL 432 PRINCIPLES OF EPIDEMIOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 201 with a grade of C or better and CHEM 122. For Nursing majors and Pre-Nursing students, CHEM 110 and BIOL 217 may substitute for CHEM 122 and BIOL 201.

Distribution and dynamics of human health problems and principles and procedures used to determine circumstances under which disease occurs or health prevails and to aid in managing and planning health and environmental systems. The broadened scope of epidemiology is examined through case studies and community and environmental health approach.

GenEd: B2,D,Interdisciplinary

BIOL 433 ECOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 200

Ecological characteristics of natural ecosystems and basic effects of human society upon those systems. Plant and animal distribution patterns in relation to past and present physical and biotic factors. Issues of resource management, population, food production, global environmental problems will also be emphasized to explore future directions. Field trips to local ecosystems will be taken. A lab fee is required.

GenEd: B2,Interdisciplinary

BIOL 434 INTRODUCTION TO BIOMEDICAL IMAGING (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and two hours lab activity per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 210 or PHYS 200

The course will present an overview of biomedical images and imaging systems. The fundamental concepts used in several imaging modalities (such as projection radiography, mammography, DEXA, computed tomography, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging) will be examined: the emphasis will be on an intuitive and descriptive presentation of the main components of these systems. Image formation and reconstruction will be addressed. The resulting clinical images will be correlated with the underlying structure and function of the organs, and the diagnostic utility and limitations of the images will be considered.

Same as PHYS 434,HLTH 434

GenEd: B1,E,Interdisciplinary

BIOL 450 ICHTHYOLOGY: THE BIOLOGY OF FISHES (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 200

This course will survey the diversity of living and fossil fishes. Fishes are the largest and most diverse group of vertebrate animals. Aspects of the ecology, physiology and evolutionary history of these animals will be examined. Extensive human interactions with fishes and particularly conservation issues will be highlighted. Emphasis will be placed on the identification and biology of California coastal and inland species. Field trips will be required. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 451 ORNITHOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week

Prerequisites: BIOL 200, BIOL 201

Introduces the evolution, diversification, anatomy, physiology, classification, ecology, behavior, conservation and special adaptations of birds in the world. It requires study and identification in the field and laboratory. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 464 MEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and two hours lab activity per week

Prerequisite: PHYS/BIOL/HLTH 434

The detection, acquisition, processing and display of diagnostic clinical images. The course will concentrate on the fundamentals of the design of the instruments and the use of appropriate reconstruction algorithms in (computed) radiography, (digital) fluoroscopy, computed tomography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and radionuclide imaging. Activities will include image reconstruction examples, investigation of recent innovations, and two trips to local Radiology departments.

Same as PHYS 464

BIOL 490 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3) [top]

Three hours seminar per week

Prerequisite: consent of the instructor

In-depth analysis of current topics in biology. Topics vary each semester. Repeatable by topic.

BIOL 491 SPECIAL LABORATORY TOPICS (1-3) [top]

Prerequisite: BIOL 300 with a grade of C or better and CHEM 122

Laboratory study of a selected topic, the title of which is to be specified in advance. Repeatable by topic. A lab fee is required.

BIOL 492 INTERNSHIP (2-3) [top]

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor and program approval

Supervised work and study in work situations involving biological research and technical skills. May involve service learning. All students are required to attend the Biology Program Senior Capstone Colloquium to present their projects.

Graded Credit/No Credit

BIOL 493 SERVICE LEARNING AT THE ZOO (1-3) [top]

One to three hours activity per week

Prerequisites: BIOL/BUS/ECON/EDUC 342 and Consent of Instructor

Working with a local zoo, individuals or teams of students will engage in service learning projects. Students will apply skills and competencies acquired in their academic programs to issues and challenges facing modern zoos.

Student Option: Graded or CR/NCR

Same as UNIV 493,BUS 493,ECON 493,EDUC 493

BIOL 494 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (1-3) [top]

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor and program approval

Laboratory and/or library research that may involve service learning in selected areas of biology conducted under the direction of a faculty member. All students are required to attend the Biology Program Senior Capstone Colloquium to present their projects.

Graded Credit/No Credit

BIOL 497 DIRECTED STUDY (1-3) [top]

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor and program approval

Reading and library research that may involve service learning in selected areas of biology conducted under the direction of a faculty member. All students are required to attend the Biology Program Senior Capstone Colloquium to present their projects.

Graded Credit/No Credit

BIOL 499 SENIOR CAPSTONE IN BIOLOGY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor

Integration of previous coursework, knowledge and skills as they apply to specific topics in Biology and the impact of biological science on society. Emphasis will be placed on analysis of scientific literature, problem solving and oral and written communication skills.

BIOL 502 TECHNIQUES IN GENOMICS/PROTEOMICS (2) [top]

Six hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 401 or consent of the instructor

This laboratory course introduces students to the current techniques and methodologies in the fields of comparative and functional genomics and proteomics. Topics and techniques covered include genome sequencing, micorarrays, mutagenesis, transgenic plants and animals, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and analysis. Students will gain hands-on lab bench experience and will make on-site visits to high volume regional biotechnology facilities.

BIOL 503 BIOTECHNOLOGY LAW & REGULATION (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Individual and organizational responsibility in R&D and commercial aspects of biotechnology. Topics include: intellectual property, privacy, government and industrial regulation, liability, ethics, and policy responses to societal concerns in the U.S. and abroad. Case studies involving gene therapy, cloning, and biomaterials in the medical and health sector, and farming and crop modification in the agricultural sector will be explored in detail.

BIOL 504 MOLECULAR CELL BIOLOGY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 300 or consent of the instructor

This course will examine molecular and mechanistic aspects of cell biology. Topics include: cell biochemistry and biosynthesis, cell signaling, regulation of the cell cycle and membrane trafficking.

BIOL 505 MOLECULAR STRUCTURE (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 400 or consent of the instructor

This course will examine the structural biology of proteins. Topics include general principles of protein structure, the biochemical function of proteins, the relationship of protein structure to its function and experimental approaches to determining and predicting protein structure and function.

BIOL 506 MOLECULAR EVOLUTION (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 400 or BIOL 401 or consent of the instructor

This course will examine evolutionary change at the molecular level. Topics include: The driving forces behind the evolutionary process, the effects of the various molecular mechanisms on the structure of genes, proteins, and genomes, the methodology for dealing with molecular data from an evolutionary perspective and the logic of molecular hypothesis testing.

BIOL 507 PHARMACOGENOMICS AND PHARMACOPROTEOMICS (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BINF 500, BIOL 504 or consent of the instructor

Structural and functional genomics with an emphasis on how these fields operate in drug discovery and optimization. Topics include: genetics of the human response to prophylactic and therapeutic agent, impact of genetic variation on therapeutic efficacy, disease mechanisms, proteomics of genetic and communicable disease, drug action and toxicity, structure encoding, lead discovery and optimization, parallel synthesis, screening virtual libraries.

BIOL 508 ADVANCED IMMUNOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 300 or consent of the instructor

This course will examine cellular and molecular aspects of the immune system. Topics include: molecular genetics and molecular structure of immunoglobulin, T cell receptor, and the MHC antigens; the functions and dysfunctions of the components of the immune system; applications of immunological technologies in modern scientific research and development.

BIOL 509 PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 400 and BIOL 422 or consent of the instructor

This course will examine the scientific and technical advances which underlie the production of genetically modified crops. Topics include: plant genome organization and gene expression, plant tissue culture and genetic transformation, genetic manipulation to confer resistance to herbicides, pests and disease and strategies for engineering stress tolerance and the improvement of crop yield and quality.

BIOL 510 TISSUE CULTURE TECHNIQUES AND STEM CELL TECHNOLOGY (3) [top]

One hour lecture and six hours lab per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 300

Examines theory and concepts of animal and plant cell and tissue culturing. Focuses on stem cell technology including types of stem cells, ethics of stem cells, pluripotency, culture methods, characterization, monitoring tools such as imaging and differentiation strategies. Lab fee required.

BIOL 600 TEAM PROJECT (4) [top]

Four hours activity per week

Prerequisite: Program approval

In this course, students will work individually and in teams to analyze, research, discuss and report on subjects relevant to the biotechnology industry.

BIOL 601 SEMINAR IN BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOINFORMATICS (1) [top]

One hour seminar per week

Discussion of up-to-date research and development findings with guest speakers, visiting scientists and industry professionals.

BIOL 610 CAPSTONE PROJECT FOR MS/MBA DUAL DEGREE (6)

Six hours seminar per week

Prerequisite: Biology or Business and Economics Program Approval

Culmintating experience in the MS/MBA dual degree program. Students participate in lectures, discussions, case analysis and independent research. Includes a major project involving research, analysis, sysnthesis and presentation of a topic related to the global biotechnology industry.

Same as BUS 610

©