ESRM 100 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)

Three hours lecture per week

This course covers a broad spectrum of environmental science topics including: biogeochemical cycles, biological diversity, world food supply, effects of agricultural production on the environment, energy, water and air environments, and societies' impacts on the environment. Current environmental issues such as loss of biological diversity, global climate change, ozone depletion, and natural resource management will be discussed.

GenEd: B2,D

ESRM 200 PRINCIPLES OF RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, CONSERVATION & STEWARDSHIP (3) [top]

Two hours lecture and two hours activity per week

Prerequisites: ESRM 100 and BIOL 200

Students will work with the National Park Service, U.S. Geological Survey or other agencies on related resource projects. Lab fee required.

ESRM 313 CONSERVATION BIOLOGY (4)

Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 200

This course explores issues surrounding the conservation of biodiversity. Topics to be covered include: species-, population-, and ecosystem-level issues, biodiversity, extinction, sustained yield, exotic species, and reserve design. Management implications and the ecology of issues are integrated throughout the course. Lab fee required.

Same as BIOL 313  

ESRM 328 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3) [top]

Two hours lecture and three hour laboratory per week

Prerequisite: ESRM 100 or consent of the instructor

Introduction to fundamental concepts and techniques of geographic information systems, including the collection, manipulation, analysis, interpretation, display, and communication of spatial information for environmental decision making. Lab fee required.

ESRM 329 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW AND POLICY (3)

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: ESRM 100 or consent of the instructor

The purpose of this course is to introduce the fundamental concepts of environmental law and policy and familiarize students with the various types of legal mechanisms used to protect the environment. A practical grounding in the basic legal concepts central to environmental law and how laws have been applied at the local, state, national, and international level will be gained. Students will also explore the purpose and function of some of the larger environmental institutions and their relationships with the public, business, and the environmental community.

ESRM 332 HUMAN ECOLOGY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

This human ecology course places humans into the environment in historical and global contexts.

Discusses systems theory as it applies to human adaptation to the environment. Studies the relations among political power, ideology, and resources, integrating concepts from ecology with those from social sciences. Theories and forecasts of human population growth and migration among regions and cultures. Social and environmental impacts of population and age distribution. Natural resource constraints on growth. Topics from land development, resource planning, environmental quality, politics, economic growth, conflicts and wars.

Same as ANTH 332

GenEd: D,Interdisciplinary

ESRM 340 POLITICS AND THE ENVIRONMENT (3)

Three hours lecture per week

Exploration of environmental politics in both the international and domestic contexts.

GenEd: Interdisciplinary

Same as POLS 340

GenEd: D,Interdisciplinary

ESRM 342 ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Examines the historical interaction between humans and their environment. Special attention will be paid to the transformations of environments in the Americas and Europe.

Same as HIST 342

GenEd: D,Interdisciplinary  

ESRM 350 ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION (4)

Two hours lecture and six hours laboratory per week

Prerequisites: ESRM 352

Introduction to environmental engineering. Students will partake in the planning and construction of ecological restoration projects in Santa Barbara, Ventura, and/or Los Angeles Counties. Particular projects will expose students to construction proceedures and techniques central to the restoration of riparian, wetland, and terrestrial communities. Lab fee required.

ESRM 351 FIELD METHODS: MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT (4) [top]

Two hours lecture and six hours laboratory per week

Prerequisite: ESRM 313

Examines a wide range of field assessment methods useful for a variety of environmental characterization efforts such as range of transect, time constraint, traping, and continuous sampling methodologies. Emphasizes practical skills development with students collecting field data and conducting subsequent analyses and assessment. Lab fee required.

ESRM 352 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION (3)

Three hours lecture per week

Introduces the theory and practice of modern ecological restoration. Conceptual similarities in the approach to wetland, riparian, forest, grassland, and subtidal restoration efforts will be explored. Special attention will be given to failed restoration efforts, articulating the conditions leading to such failures, and minimum performance standards for successful projects.

ESRM 410 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 433, ECON 362, ESRM 328 and ESRM 329

This course will introduce students to methods and procedures designed to assess and minimize human impacts on natural systems. Topics to be covered include the components of environmental impact reports and assessments, and the processes involved in preparation and approval. Also addressed will be the issues related to mitigating environmental impacts.

ESRM 440 POPULATION STUDIES (3)

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisites: SOC 100 and MATH 202

This course focuses on the basic concepts, skills and issues in demography and population studies. It will apply concepts to contemporary population issues such as family demography, urban transition, environmental degredation, and economic development.

Same as SOC 440

GenEd: D,Interdisciplinary  

ESRM 443 ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATION (3) [top]

Three hours lecture per week

Prerequisite: ESRM 100 and COMM 101 or COMM 320

Students will analyze and engage in debates about local, national and global environmental disputes. Topics include analysis of risk, community dialogue and strategic environmental messages.

Same as COMM 443  

GenEd: D, Interdisciplinary

ESRM 462 COASTAL AND MARINE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (4)

Three hours lecture and two hours activity per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 433, ESRM 200 and ESRM 329

Provides an introduction to marine provinces , physical and biological oceanography, threats to the marine environment across various temporal and spatial scales and various policies and programs to improve resource management.

ESRM 463 WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (4) [top]

Three hours lecture and two hours activity per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 433, ESRM 200, and ESRM 329

Water management principles focusing on surface and ground water hydrology; water conservation, watershed development; water quality measurement and monitoring; water and wildlife/fisheries; and water conflicts.

ESRM 464 LAND USE PLANNING AND OPEN SPACE MANAGEMENT (4)

Three hours lecture and two hours activity per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 433, ESRM 200 and ESRM 329

Examines various approaches to land use planning at the municipal, state, national, and international level focusing on the role of land use planning in managing open space and protected area lands within and adjacent to urban areas.

ESRM 481 TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION (3) [top]

Three hours seminar per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 433 and 432, CHEM 250 and 251

Topics may include: analysis of pollution transformation and transport; impacts on human and natural systems; and examples from tropospheric air pollution, water pollution, soil pollution, climate change.

ESRM 482 ISSUES IN ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3)

Three hours seminar per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 433, ECON 362 and ESRM 329

Selected issues in resource development derived from current resource policy changes, or other emerging topics of interest.

ESRM 483 ISSUES IN GLOBAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3) [top]

Three hours seminar per week

Prerequisite: BIOL 433, ECON 362 and ESRM 329

Selected issues in global resource management. Topics may include climate change, ocean management, desertification, air pollution, ozone depletion, patterns of consumption, water pollution, water allocation, international policy or legislative instruments, or other topics as appropriate.

ESRM 490 SPECIAL TOPICS (3)

Three hours seminar per week

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

In-depth analysis of current topics in environmental science and resource management. Topics vary each semester.

ESRM 491 CAPSTONE PREPARATION (1) [top]

One hours activity per week

Prerequisite: Senior standing in the Environmental Science and Resource Management major

Research and develop a proposal for an ESRM project.

ESRM 492 SERVICE LEARNING/INTERNSHIP (3)

Six hours per week

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

Individual internship through service learning.

Graded Credit/No Credit  

ESRM 494 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (1-3) [top]

Variable hours per week

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

Individual research on topic selected by the student and faculty mentor. Repeatable for up to nine units.

Graded Credit/No Credit  

ESRM 499 CAPSTONE (3)

Three hours of lecture / discussion per week

Prerequisite: Upper division required courses in ESRM major (may be completed concurrently)

This course consists of an interdisciplinary evaluation of the physical, biological, social, economic, and legal dimensions of environmental decision-making. The instructor will select from Southern California ecosystems - and decisions with associated environmental impacts - for evaluation and analysis. Topics include decisions to reduce, control, or treat surface water run-off, establishing or changing the management of marine protected areas, dredging in harbors, and permits for coastal development. Students will provide results to appropriate national, state, or local agencies for consideration and deliberation in administrative decisions.