Printable Version of Our Annual Security Report & Fire Safety Report (PDF, 319KB)

Resources for Campus Security Authorities

2014 Annual Security Report & Fire Safety Report

As Amended by the Violence Against Woman Reauthorization Act of 2013

This document is formally known as The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act and Fire Safety Report

Updated October 1, 2014

Introduction

The University Police Department prepares this report to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act.

This report is prepared in cooperation with police agencies surrounding the main campus and alternate sites, the offices of Housing & Residential Education, the Dean of Students, and the Division of Student Affairs. Each entity provides updated information on their educational efforts and programs necessary to ensure compliance with the Act.

Preparation of the Annual Security Report and Fire Safety Report

Officials assigned to University Police prepare this report to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. This report is prepared in cooperation with the local law enforcement agencies surrounding our main campus and alternate sites, Housing and Residential Education, the Division of Student Affairs, the Dean of Students, Human Resources and Faculty Affairs.

Reporting Criminal Actions or Other Emergencies

Students and others on CI’s Main Campus – located at One University Drive, Camarillo, CA 93012 – are strongly encouraged to report non-emergency criminal actions to the University Police Department at 805-437-8444. In an emergency situation – one that requires immediate assistance from public safety services – please call 9-1-1. Blue Light direct connect emergency telephones are located throughout the campus. Push the red button to connect directly to a 9-1-1 dispatcher.

Students and others on CI’s Thousand Oaks Campus – located at 501 Marin Street #200, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 – are strongly encouraged to report non-emergency criminal actions to the Thousand Oaks Police Department at 805-494-8260. Always dial 9-1-1 in the event of an emergency.

Students and others on CI’s Goleta Campus – located at 5383 Hollister Ave, Suite 220, Goleta, CA 93111 – are strongly encouraged to report non-emergency criminal actions to the Goleta Police Department at 805-681-4100. Always dial 9-1-1 in the event of an emergency.

Students and others on public property, that is all public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that is within the Main Campus, the Thousand Oaks Campus or the Goleta Campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from each respective campus, are strongly encouraged to report non-emergency criminal actions to the law enforcement agency with jurisdiction. Always dial 9-1-1 in the event of an emergency.

Students and others on non-campus buildings or property, that is any building or property owned or controlled by CI that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, CI’s educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of one of CI’s three campuses are strongly encouraged to report non-emergency criminal actions to the law enforcement agency with jurisdiction. As always dial 9-1-1 in the event of an emergency.

Mandated Reporting

While University employees are generally encouraged to report non-emergency criminal actions to University Police there are two situations when employees must report suspected criminal activity.

The first is whenever an employee, in his/her professional capacity or within the scope of his/her employment, has knowledge of or observes a child (i.e., a person under the age of 18 years) whom the employee knows, or reasonably suspects, to have been the victim of child abuse or neglect. In such a situation the employee must report the incident to University Police.

The second is when the employee becomes aware of relevant details about any sexual violence incident. Employees, except physicians, licensed counselors, sexual assault counselors and advocates, must report to the Title IX Coordinator all relevant details about any sexual violence incidents of which they become aware.

Confidential Reporting

If you are the victim or witness of a criminal action you may want to consider making a confidential report. Please call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) or go online to www.venturacountycrimestoppers.org to report your matter confidentially.

The purpose of a confidential report is to comply with your wishes to keep the matter confidential, while taking steps to ensure the future safety of yourself and others. With such information the University Police can keep an accurate record of the number of criminal incidents, determine where there is a pattern of crime with regard to a particular location, method, or assailant, and alert the campus community to potential danger. Reports filed in this manner are counted and disclosed in the annual crime statistics for the University.

Other Resources

Title IX Coordinator
Lindero Hall, Room 2801
805-437-8423

Dean of Students
Bell Tower East, Room 2568
805-437-3218

AVP for Wellness and Athletics
Bell Tower East, Room 1752
805-437-8547

AVP for Human Resources
Lindero Hall, Room 2801
805-437-8490

Executive Director of ASI
Student Union, Room 1054
805-437-2622

Executive Director of Housing and Residential Education
Santa Cruz Village, E150
805-437-2733

Director of CI’s Thousand Oaks Campus
501 Marin Street, Suite 200
Thousand Oaks, CA
805-497-3791

Director of CI’s Goleta Campus
5383 Hollister Ave, Suite 220
Goleta, CA

Timely Warnings

Timely warnings, or alerts, are provided to the community whenever a situation presents a serious or continuing threat to students or employees. The intent of a timely warning is to provide information that enables individuals to better protect themselves.

In the event that a situation arises, either on or immediately adjacent to, the Main Campus, that, in the judgment of police officials, constitutes an ongoing or continuing threat, a campus wide timely warning will be issued. Police officials will issue the warning through the campus’ e-mail system to students, faculty, and staff, and physical notices will be posted in each residence hall, at the Student Union, the Police Department, the Broome Library, and at the Town Center. Depending on the particular circumstances of the crime, police officials may also: (1) broadcast a live audio message to all campus IP telephones; (2) and/or issue a simultaneous telephone, e-mail, text/SMS, and TTY/TDD message via the CI Alert emergency messaging system; (3) and/or post a notice on the campus’ web site at www.csuci.edu. Anyone with information regarding an ongoing or continuing threat to the Main Campus community should immediately report the circumstances to the University Police Department at 805-437-8444 or in person at the dispatch center located in Placer Hall, immediately adjacent to the A1 parking lot.

In the event that a situation arises, either on, or immediately adjacent to, the Thousand Oaks or Goleta Campuses, that, in the judgment of police officials or the respective Campus Director, constitutes an ongoing or continuing threat, a campus wide timely warning will be issued. The Campus Director will physically post the timely warning notice throughout the campus. Anyone with information regarding an ongoing or continuing threat to the Thousand Oaks or Goleta Campuses should immediately report the appropriate police agency and the Campus Director.

In the event that a situation arises at a non-campus building or property, that, in the judgment of police or university officials, constitutes an ongoing or continuing threat, a timely warning notice will be issued. The university official responsible for the non-campus building or property will physically post the notice at the site.

Security of and Access to Campus Facilities, including Campus Residences

The academic and administrative buildings on the Main Campus are generally open to the public during normal business hours. Business hours are appropriately posted. After-hours entry is facilitated by means of a centralized access control system managed by Facilities Services and the University Police Department. The grounds and facilities are patrolled by university police officers 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Police officers work to ensure the grounds and facilities remain secure during non-business hours. Access to the Main Campus’ residence halls is restricted to residents, their approved guests, and other approved members of the community. Entry to residence hall facilities is controlled by means of a centralized access control system managed by Housing and Residential Education, Facilities Services, and University Police.

The facilities at the Thousand Oaks and Goleta Campuses are generally open during posted business hours. Either the Campus Director or a classified staff member is available on-site when the respective campus is open. After-hours entry is facilitated by means of a mechanical key locking system managed by the respective Campus Director. The facilities are patrolled by the respective municipal police agency on a non-fixed schedule.

Security Considerations used in the Maintenance of Campus Facilities

Police officials are responsible for conducting on-going security surveys on the Main Campus. The purpose of surveys is to examine and/or test security features such as landscaping, locks, alarms, lighting, and communications. Defective or inadequate findings are reported to Facilities Services for repair or replacement. Additionally during the academic year, the Dean of Students, Executive Director for Housing and Residential Education, Police Lieutenant, University Psychologist and appropriate others meet bi-weekly to discuss issues relevant to safety and security on campus. Students and others who encounter unsafe conditions, or have other concerns with the campus environment should contact University Police at 805-437-8444

On the Thousand Oaks and Goleta Campuses the respective Campus Director is responsible for conducting on-going, general security surveys of the facilities. The Directors meet with Main Campus police officials on a regular basis to discuss issues relevant to safety and security. Students and others who encounter unsafe conditions, or have other concerns with the campus environment should contact the respective Campus Director.

Law Enforcement Authority

CI police officers on the Main Campus have full arrest powers. They are certified by the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training as peace officers. They undergo extensive training to develop and maintain their law enforcement skills.

CI police officers are on duty 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. They are armed with firearms and conduct continuous preventative patrols of the campus. They are authorized to enforce all state laws and regulations.

The Thousand Oaks and Goleta Campuses do not maintain a security department. Local law enforcement officials patrol on or near the campus but CI does not have a written agreement or contract with them for these services.

Students and others on CI’s Thousand Oaks Campus are strongly encouraged to report non-emergency criminal actions to the Thousand Oaks Police Department at 805-494-8260. Always dial 9-1-1 in the event of an emergency.

Students and others on CI’s Goleta Campus are strongly encouraged to report non-emergency criminal actions to the Goleta Police Department at 805-681-4100. Always dial 9-1-1 in the event of an emergency.

The Working Relationship with State and Local Law Enforcement

Police Officers on the Main Campus work closely with the California Highway Patrol and the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office. Both these law enforcement agencies have concurrent jurisdiction on campus and routinely patrol areas immediately adjacent to the campus. The CI Police Chief, as a member of the Ventura County Law Enforcement Coordinating Committee, meets monthly with the Sheriff and all other Police Chiefs in the County.

In accordance with the Kristin Smart Campus Security Act of 1998, CI Police and the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office have a written agreement that designates which agency will have operational responsibility for the investigation of violent crimes that occur on campus.

Counselors and Confidential Crime Reporting

Campus Pastoral Counselors and Campus Professional Counselors, when acting as such, are not required to report crimes to the campus police. As a matter of policy, they are encouraged; if and when they deem it appropriate, to inform persons being counseled of the procedures to report crimes – on a voluntary basis - to the appropriate law enforcement agency.

Security Awareness Programs for Students and Employees

During their respective orientation sessions students and others are informed of services offered by University Police. Presentations outline ways to maintain personal safety, emergency preparedness and residence hall security. They are told about crime on-campus and in surrounding areas. Crime prevention programs and sexual assault prevention programs are offered on a continual basis. In addition to seminars, information – in the form of newsletters, flyers, posters, articles, and displays - is disseminated to students and employees throughout the academic year. In those situations where there is an identified threat to the campus, timely warning notifications are issued.

Crime Prevention Programs for Students and Employees

Crime prevention programs are sponsored by various campus organizations throughout the year. University Police officials facilitate programs for student, parent, faculty, and new employee orientations, student organizations, community organizations, in addition to regular training for residence hall assistants.

University Police offers Rape Aggression Defense System (RAD) training each semester. RAD is a comprehensive course that begins with awareness, prevention, risk reduction and avoidance, while progressing on to the basics of hands-on defense training. Certified RAD instructors teach all courses provided.

Additionally, University Police regularly offers training seminars on: (1) Recognizing and Preventing Violence on Campus; (2) Guidance for Surviving an Active Shooter Situation; and (3) Intimate Partner Violence and Stalking, the Impact on the Workplace.

For more information on crime prevention programs offered by University Police please call 805-437-8444 and ask to speak to Rachel Huff, the department’s Outreach Coordinator.

Possession, Use and Sale of Alcoholic Beverages and Enforcement of Underage Drinking Laws

The possession, sale or the furnishing of alcohol on the CI campuses is governed by University policy and California state Law. Laws regarding the possession, sale, consumption or furnishing of alcohol is controlled by the California Department of Alcohol and Beverage Control (ABC). However, the enforcement of alcohol laws on the Main Campus is the primary responsibility of the UCSD Police Department. The University is committed to maintaining and environment that is predominantly free of the use of alcoholic beverages and in full compliance with federal and state laws. Students, employees and visitors who violate laws or University policies concerning alcoholic beverages shall be subject to criminal prosecution and/or institutional sanctions. Such sanctions, for students, may include behavioral probation, suspension or termination/expulsion.

Possession, Use and Sale of Illegal Drugs and Enforcement of Federal and State Drug Laws

All the CI campuses have been designated as (illegal) “Drug Free” institutions. It is both unlawful and a violation of University policy to possess marijuana or a controlled substance, without a valid prescription, on any of CI’s campuses.

The University does not recognize medical marijuana authorization cards – even within the residence hall environment. Marijuana, under federal Law (Title 21 U.S. Code), is classified as an illegal substance. Students, employees and visitors who violate laws or University policies concerning controlled substances or marijuana shall be subject to criminal prosecution and/or institutional sanctions. Such sanctions, for students, may include behavioral probation, suspension or termination/expulsion.

Substance Abuse Education

CI has established a substance abuse awareness program to educate students and others about: (1) CI’s substance abuse policies; (2) the dangers of drugs and alcohol in an academic environment; (3) student assistance programs; and (4) disciplinary action that may be imposed on students who violate University policy or state and/or federal Law. The program includes dissemination of informational materials, educational programs, counseling services, and referrals.

CI requires that first-year students living in on-campus housing participate in AlcoholEdu® programming. AlcoholEDU® incorporates the latest evidence-based prevention methods to create a highly personalized user experience that inspires students to reflect on and consider changing their drinking behaviors.

CI Police have partnered with Ventura County Behavioral Health on a mobile DUI prevention/education exhibit. DUI Prevention – Crashed Car Trailer Exhibit is displayed twice each year on campus
for the purpose of raising awareness about impaired driving, and to support good riving decisions.

In October of each year CI supports National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week by providing Aware, Awake, Alive seminars and materials. The program provides students with the tools and confidence to prevent lives from being lost due to alcohol poisoning.

In March CI supports Safe Spring Break Week by sponsoring an on-campus educational fair. Through innovative programming, students receive information on responsible alcohol use, driving safety, sexual safety and personal safety.

Personal Counseling Services, a work group within the Division of Student Affairs, provides for overall coordination of the Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug (ATOD) education efforts on campus. ATOD staff is located in Bell Tower East, 1865 and may be reached at 805-437-2088. ATOD resources are also available at:

Dean of Students
Bell Tower, East, Room 2568
805-437-3218

AVP for Human Resources
Lindero Hall, Room 2801
805-437-8490

Assistant Provost for Faculty Affairs
Bell Tower, West, Room 2168
805-437-3274

University Police
Placer Hall
805-437-8444

Disclosures to Alleged Victims of Crimes of Violence or Non-forcible Sex Offenses

CI’s Dean of Students will, upon written request, disclose to the alleged victim of a crime of violence, or a non-forcible sex offense, the results of any disciplinary hearing conducted by the University against the student who is the alleged perpetrator of the crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of the crime or offense, the Dean of Students will provide the results of the disciplinary hearing to the victim’s next of kin, if so requested.

Sex Offense Policy, Procedures and Programs

The California State University does not discriminate on the basis of sex, gender, or sexual orientation in its education programs or activities. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and certain other federal and state laws, prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex, gender, or sexual orientation in employment, as well as all education programs and activities operated by the University (both on and off campus), and protect all people regardless of their gender or gender identity from sex discrimination, which includes sexual harassment and sexual violence.

Sexual Violence is a form of Sexual Harassment and means physical sexual acts, such as unwelcome sexual touching, sexual assault, sexual battery, rape, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking (when based on gender or sex), perpetrated against an individual against his or her will and without consent or against an individual who is incapable of giving consent due to that individual's use of drugs or alcohol, status as a minor, or disability. Sexual Violence may include physical force, violence, threat, or intimidation, ignoring the objections of the other person, causing the other person’s intoxication or incapacitation through the use of drugs or alcohol, or taking advantage of the other person’s incapacitation (including voluntary intoxication).

Sexual Assault is a form of Sexual Violence and is an attempt, coupled with the ability, to commit a violent injury on the person of another because of that person’s gender or sex.

Sexual Battery is a form of Sexual Violence and is any willful and unlawful use of force or violence upon the person of another because of that person’s gender or sex.

Rape is a form of Sexual Violence, and is non-consensual sexual intercourse that may also involve the use of threat of force, violence, or immediate and unlawful bodily injury or threats of future retaliation and duress. Any sexual penetration, however slight, is sufficient to constitute rape. Sexual acts including intercourse are considered non-consensual when the person is incapable of giving consent because s/he is incapacitated from alcohol and/or drugs, is under 18 years old, or if a mental disorder or developmental or physical disability renders the person incapable of giving consent. The accused’s relationship to the person (such as family member, spouse, friend, acquaintance or stranger) is irrelevant. (See complete definition of Consent below.)

Acquaintance Rape is a form of Sexual Violence committed by an individual known to the victim. This includes a person the victim may have just met; i.e., at a party, introduced through a friend, or on a social networking website. (See above for definition of Rape.)

Consent means an informed, affirmative, conscious decision by each participant to engage in mutually agreed-upon sexual activity.

Consent must be voluntary, and given without coercion, force, threats, or intimidation. Consent requires positive cooperation in a particular sexual act, or expression of intent to engage in that sexual act through the exercise of free will.

Consent can be withdrawn or revoked. Consent to one form of sexual activity (or one sexual act) does not constitute consent to other forms of sexual activity (or other sexual acts). Consent to sexual activity given on one occasion does not constitute consent to sexual activity on another occasion. The fact that two people are or were in a dating or sexual relationship does not constitute consent to engage in sexual activity. There must always be mutual and affirmative consent to engage in sexual activity. Consent to a sexual act may be withdrawn or revoked at any time, including after penetration. The victim’s request for the perpetrator to use a condom or birth control does not, in and of itself, constitute consent. Once consent is withdrawn or revoked, the sexual activity must stop immediately.

Consent cannot be given by a person who is incapacitated. For example, a person cannot give consent if s/he is unconscious or coming in and out of consciousness. A person is incapacitated if s/he lacks the physical and/or mental ability to make informed, rational judgments. Examples of incapacitation include unconsciousness, sleep and blackouts. Whether an intoxicated person (as a result of using alcohol or other drugs) is incapacitated depends on the extent to which the alcohol or other drugs impact the person’s decision-making capacity, awareness of consequences, and ability to make fully informed judgments. A person with a medical or mental disability may also lack the capacity to give consent.

Being intoxicated by drugs or alcohol does not diminish a person’s responsibility to obtain consent from the other party before engaging in sexual activity. Factors to be considered include whether the person knew, or whether a reasonable person in the accused’s position should have known, that the victim did not give, or revoked, consent; was incapacitated; or was otherwise incapable of giving consent.

Sexual intercourse with a minor is never consensual when the victim is under 18 years old, because the victim is considered incapable of giving legal consent due to age.

Domestic Violence is a form of Sexual Violence and is abuse committed against someone who is a current or former spouse, current or former cohabitant, someone with whom the abuser has a child, someone with whom the abuser has or had a dating or engagement relationship, or a person similarly situated under California domestic or family violence law. Cohabitant means two unrelated persons living together for a substantial period of time, resulting in some permanency of relationship. Factors that may determine whether persons are cohabiting include, but are not limited to (1) sexual relations between the parties while sharing the same living quarters, (2) sharing of income or expenses, (3) joint use or ownership of property, (4) whether the parties hold themselves out as husband and wife, (5) the continuity of the relationship, and (6) the length of the relationship.

Dating Violence is a form of Sexual Violence, and is abuse committed by a person who is or has been in a social or dating relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. This may include someone the victim just met; i.e., at a party, introduced through a friend, or on a social networking website.

Stalking is a form of Sexual Violence, and involves a repeated course of conduct directed at a specific person (when based on gender or sex) that places that person in reasonable fear for his/her or others’ safety, or to suffer substantial emotional distress.

Training, Education, and Preventative Measures

The University has implemented preventive education programs to promote the awareness of CSU policies against Sexual Violence (including Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking) and to make victim resources available, including comprehensive victim services. Information regarding these programs is included in (1) orientation programs for all new students and employees; (2) training for students who serve as resident assistants in student housing; and (3) training for student athletes and coaches. Ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns for all students and employees are also conducted. These programs include the following information: (1) a statement that the University prohibits Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking; (2) what constitutes Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking; (3) the definition of Consent; (4) a statement that Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking violate University policy and criminal law; (5) common facts and myths about the causes of Sexual Violence; (6) safe and positive options for bystander intervention that may be taken by an individual to prevent harm or intervene in risky situations involving these offenses; (7) methods of encouraging peer support for victims; (8) how to recognize warning signs of abusive behavior and how to avoid potential attacks; and (9) information regarding University’s policies, procedures and available resources related to incidents of Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking.

The following preventative education programs, as described above, are currently being presented to the University community: (1) Island View Orientation is a comprehensive orientation program delivered to all incoming freshmen and transfer students. This program is presented several times throughout the summer for incoming freshmen and fall semester transfer students, and again in January for incoming spring semester transfer students; (2) New Employee Orientation is a comprehensive orientation program delivered to all new employees of the University. This program is presented in September and January of each year; (3) RA Training is a comprehensive, week-long training program delivered to all resident assistants employed in Housing and Residential Education. This program is presented each year just prior to the start of the fall semester; (4) Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) is a program of realistic, self-defense tactics and techniques. The RAD system is a comprehensive course for women, which begins with awareness, prevention, risk reduction and avoidance, and progresses on to the basics of hands-on defense training. At a minimum, this program is presented during the fall and spring semester each year; (5) The Sexual Assault Awareness Week campaign is presented during the spring semester of each year by The Center for Multicultural Engagement and Multicultural Programs (MP), and includes nationally-recognized sexual violence prevention programs; (6) The Clothesline Project was started by women in Massachusetts as a way to “air the dirty laundry” of sexual assault and give survivors a productive, artistic outlet for their anger and emotions. Previous year's t-shirts and new t-shirts designed by CI students hang on clotheslines assembled at the Courtyard of the Student Union; and (7) Take Back the Night raises awareness about the issue of sexual violence, empowers survivors and lets it be known that violence of any kind will not be tolerated in our community.

Possible Sanctions for Committing Acts of Sexual Violence

Individuals alleged to have committed Sexual Violence may face criminal prosecution by law enforcement and may incur penalties as a result of civil litigation. In addition, employees and students may face discipline/sanctions at the University. Employees may face sanctions up to and including dismissal from employment, per established CSU policies and provisions of applicable collective bargaining agreements. Students and employees charged with Sexual Violence will also be subject to discipline, pursuant University policies, and will be subject to appropriate sanctions.

If it is determined that University policy prohibiting Sexual Violence was violated, the perpetrator will be subject to discipline, up to and including dismissal from University employment or expulsion from the University.

In addition, during any investigation, the University may implement interim measures in order to maintain a safe and non-discriminatory educational and working environment. Such measures may include immediate interim suspension of the accused from the University, a required move from University-owned or affiliated housing, an adjustment to work or course schedule, or prohibition from contact with parties involved in the alleged incident.

What to Do and Who to Contact if You are a Victim of Sexual Violence

Call 9-1-1 if you are in the midst of any kind of emergency, immediate harm or threat of harm.

If you have experienced Sexual Violence you are encouraged to seek immediate assistance from police and healthcare providers for your physical safety, emotional support and medical care.

The police can escort you to a safe place and transport you to a hospital or a sexual assault response center for a medical examination, if needed. The police can also provide access to a confidential sexual assault advocate. If you would prefer not to notify the police, you are strongly encouraged to seek assistance from the campus Title IX Coordinator who can provide you with information on your options, rights and remedies, and/or a sexual assault counselor or advocate. The campus Title IX Coordinator is available to assist you in notifying the police, if you wish.

You have the right to decide who and when to tell about sexual violence. However, it is very important that you get confidential medical attention after being assaulted. Following the incident, you may be physically injured, there may be a chance you contracted a sexually transmitted disease, or that you may become pregnant.

The University has designated a Title IX Coordinator to monitor and oversee overall compliance with laws and policies related to nondiscrimination based on sex. The campus Title IX Coordinator is available to explain and discuss: Your right to file a criminal complaint (in cases of Sexual Violence); the University’s relevant complaint process, and your right to receive assistance with that process, including the investigation process; how confidentiality is handled; available resources, both on and off campus; and other related matters.

It is important that you take steps to preserve and collect evidence; doing so preserves the full range of options available to you, be it through the university’s administrative complaint procedures or criminal prosecution. To preserve evidence: (1) do not wash your face or hands; (2) do not shower or bathe; (3) do not brush your teeth; (4) do not change clothes or straighten up the area where the assault took place: (5) do not dispose of clothes or other items that were present during the assault, or use the restroom; and (6) seek a medical exam immediately. If you already cleaned up from the assault, you can still report the crime, as well as seek medical or counseling treatment. You may consult with the campus Title IX Coordinator or a local sexual assault victim resource center for assistance as well.

CSU Channel Islands Title IX Coordinator:

Laurie Nichols
Solano Hall #1151; laurie.nichols@csuci.edu(805) 437-8423
Office Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

CSU Channel Islands Title IX Deputy Coordinator:

Anna Pavin
Solano Hall #1152; anna.pavin@csuci.edu(805) 437-8425
Office Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

University Police
CI Police Department
Placer Hall; police@csuci.edu
(805) 437-8444
www.csuci.edu/police

Local Police

Thousand Oaks Campus
Thousand Oaks Police Department
2101 E. Olsen Rd.
Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
(805) 494-8260

Goleta Campus
Goleta Police Department
4434 Calle Real
Santa Barbara, CA 93110
(805) 681-4100

Sexual Violence Reporting Options

The University’s primary concern is your safety and the safety of the campus community.The use of alcohol or drugs never makes the victim at fault for sexual violence. If you have experienced sexual violence, you should not be deterred from reporting the incident out of a concern that you might be disciplined for related violations of drug, alcohol, or other University policies. Except in extreme circumstances, University students or employees who are victims of sexual violence will not be subject to discipline.

You have several reporting options, and you may pursue one or all of these options at any time. It is your right to have a friend, family member, sexual assault advocate, or other representative present with you while reporting the incident. You also have the right to have a sexual assault counselor and support person of your choice present with you during a rape examination. The campus Title IX Coordinator can assist you in notifying the police if you choose.

Criminal: Reporting to University police and/or local police is an option at any time following a Sexual Violence incident. If you choose not to report to the police immediately, you can still make the report at a later time. However, with the passage of time, the ability to gather evidence to assist with criminal prosecution may be limited. Depending on the circumstances, the police may be able to obtain a criminal restraining order on your behalf.

Administrative: You may report to the campus Title IX Coordinator any incident of Sexual Violence (e.g., Rape, Acquaintance Rape, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence or Stalking). Contact information for the Title IX Coordinator is listed above. The Title IX Coordinator will provide you with written and verbal information regarding applicable University complaint procedures for investigating and addressing the incident.

The campus Title IX Coordinator will also discuss with you any reasonable interim remedies the University may offer prior to conclusion of an investigation or potential disciplinary action to reduce or eliminate negative impact on you and provide you with available assistance. Examples include: Adjustment to University work assignments, course schedules or supervisory reporting relationship; requiring the accused to move from University-owned or affiliated housing; immediately prohibiting the accused from coming to the University; or prohibiting the accused from contacting you. These options may be available to you whether or not you choose to report the Sexual Violence to campus police or local law enforcement. The Title IX Coordinator remains available to assist you and provide you with reasonable remedies requested by you throughout the reporting, investigative, and disciplinary processes, and thereafter.

If it is determined that University policy prohibiting Sexual Violence was violated, the perpetrator will be subject to discipline, up to and including dismissal from University employment or expulsion from the University. You are entitled to be accompanied to any related meeting or proceeding by an advisor of your choice. However, if you do not wish to participate in an investigation or hearing process, you have the right to decline to do so.

Health/Counseling/Clergy:You may choose to seek advice and assistance from physicians, psychotherapists, professional counselors, clergy, sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates, including individuals who work or volunteer for them.

Civil Lawsuit: You may choose to file a civil lawsuit against the perpetrator, whether or not criminal charges have been filed. A civil lawsuit provides you the opportunity to recover actual damages, which may include compensation for medical expenses, lost wages, pain, suffering and emotional distress.

You may also choose to obtain a protective or restraining order (such as a domestic violence restraining order or a civil harassment restraining order). Restraining orders must be obtained from a court in the jurisdiction where the incident occurred. Restraining orders can protect victims who have experienced or are reasonably in fear of Sexual Violence, including Domestic Violence, Dating Violence and Stalking. Your campus Title IX Coordinator can offer assistance with obtaining a protective or restraining order.

Non-reporting: You are strongly encouraged to report any incident of Sexual Violence to the police and/or campus Title IX Coordinator so that steps may be taken to protect you and the rest of the campus community. However, non-reporting is also an option.

Sexual Violence Complaint and Disciplinary Procedures

The University has formal written procedures that provide for a campus investigation of reports of sexual violence, written findings sent to the accuser and the accused, and a review of the campus investigative findings by the CSU Chancellor’s Office. The procedure for CSU employees and third parties is separate from, but similar to the procedure for CSU students. Your campus Title IX Coordinator can explain these procedures in detail.

At the conclusion of the University’s complaint procedure, any employee or student found to have violated University policy against sexual violence will be subject to discipline. Discipline would be administered consistent with applicable collective bargaining agreements (for employees), University policies and legal requirements. As the victim, you are not required to participate in any University disciplinary procedure and may choose not to be a part of it.

Disciplinary procedures for sexual violence will provide for a prompt, fair, and impartial investigation and resolution, and are conducted by officials who receive annual training on issues related to Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking, and how to conduct an investigation and hearing process that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability. The standard of proof that will be used during any institutional conduct proceeding arising from such a complaint shall be the preponderance of the evidence, meaning the greater weight of the evidence; i.e. that the evidence on one side outweighs, preponderates over, or is more than, the evidence on the other side.

The accuser and the accused are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present during a disciplinary proceeding, including the opportunity to be accompanied to any related meeting or proceeding by the advisor of their choice.

Both the accuser and the accused will be simultaneously informed in writing of (1) the outcome of any disciplinary proceedings that arises from an allegation of Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking; (2) the University’s procedures for the accused to appeal the results of the disciplinary proceeding; (3) any change to the disciplinary results that occurs prior to the time such results become final; and (4) when disciplinary results become final.

Confidentiality in Sexual Violence Incidents

We encourage victims of Sexual Violence, including Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, and Stalking (collectively Sexual Violence) to talk to someone about what happened – so you can get the support you need, and so the University can respond appropriately. Whether – and the extent to which – a University employee may agree to maintain confidentiality (and not disclose information to the Title IX Coordinator) depends on the employee’s position and responsibilities at the University. This information is intended to make you aware of the various reporting and confidential disclosure options available to you – so you can make informed choices about where to turn for help. The University encourages victims to talk to someone identified in one or more of these groups.

As explained below, some employees are required by law to maintain near complete confidentiality; talking to them is sometimes called a “privileged communication.” Other employees may talk to a victim in confidence, and generally only report to the University that an incident occurred without revealing any personally identifying information. Finally, some employees are required to report all details of an incident (including the identities of both the victim and alleged perpetrator) to the Title IX Coordinator. A report to these employees constitutes a report to the University, and generally creates a legal obligation for the University to investigate the incident and take appropriate steps to address the situation.

Physicians, psychotherapists, professional, licensed counselors, and clergy who work or volunteer on or off campus, and who provide medical or mental health treatment or counseling (including those who act in that role under their supervision) may not report anyinformation about an incident of Sexual Violence to anyone else at the University, including the Title IX Coordinator, without your consent. You can seek assistance and support from physicians, psychotherapists, professional, licensed counselors, and clergy without triggering a University investigation that could reveal your identity or the fact of your disclosure. However, see limited exceptions below regarding when health care practitioners must report to local law enforcement agencies. Health care practitioners should explain these limited exceptions to, if applicable.

Sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates who work or volunteer on or off campus in sexual assault centers, victim advocacy offices, women’s centers, and health centers (including all individuals who work or volunteer in these centers and offices, as well as non-professional counselors or advocates, and those who act in that role under their supervision) may talk to you without revealing any information about you or the incident of sexual violence to anyone else at the University, including the Title IX Coordinator, without your consent. You can seek assistance and support from these counselors and advocates without triggering a University investigation that could reveal your identity or that you disclosed an incident to them. However, see limited exceptions below regarding when sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates must report to local law enforcement agencies. Counselors and advocates should explain these limited exceptions to you, if applicable. Contact information for sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates can be found below.

If you speak only to a physician, professional counselor, clergy member, sexual assault counselor, domestic violence counselor or advocate, you must understand that the University will be unable to conduct an investigation into the particular incident or pursue disciplinary action against the perpetrator, if you choose to maintain confidentiality.

Even so, these individuals will still assist you in receiving other necessary protection and support, such as victim advocacy, disability, medical/health or mental health services, or legal services. They may not, however, be able to assist you with University academic support or accommodations, or changes to University-based living or working schedules, or assist with adjustments to course schedules. Only the University and the Title IX Coordinator can assist with those matters (see below). A victim who at first requests confidentiality may later decide to file a complaint with the University or report the incident to the police, and thus have the incident fully investigated. These counselors and advocates can provide you with that assistance if you wish. These counselors and advocates will also explain that Title IX includes protections against retaliation, and that the University will not only take steps to prevent retaliation when it knows or reasonably should know of possible retaliation, but will also take strong responsive action if it occurs.

EXCEPTIONS: Under California law, any health practitioner employed in a health facility, clinic, physician’s office, or local or state public health department or clinic is required to make a report to local law enforcement if he or she provides medical services for a physical conditionto a patient/victim who he or she knows or reasonably suspects is suffering from (1) a wound or physical injury inflicted by a firearm; or (2) any wound or other physical injury inflicted upon a victim where the injury is the result of assaultive or abusive conduct (including Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, and Dating Violence). This exception does not apply to sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates. Health care practitioners should explain this limited exception to you, if applicable.

Additionally, under California law, allprofessionals described above (physicians, psychotherapists, professional counselors, clergy, and sexual assault and domestic violence counselors and advocates) are mandatory child abuse and neglect reporters, and are required to report incidents involving victims under 18 years of age to local law enforcement. These professionals will explain this limited exception to you, if applicable.

Finally, some or all of these professionals may also have reporting obligations under California law to (1) local law enforcement in cases involving threats of immediate or imminent harm to self or others where disclosure of the information is necessary to prevent the threatened danger; or (2) the court if compelled by court order or subpoena in a criminal proceeding related to the Sexual Violence incident. If applicable, these professionals will explain this limited exception to you.

Confidentiality when Reporting to Police

If you report to local or University Police about Sexual Violence, the police are required to notify you that your name will become a matter of public record unless confidentiality isrequested. If you request that your identity be kept confidential, your name will not become a matter of public record and the police will not report your identity to anyone else at the University, including the Title IX Coordinator. University Police will, however, report the facts of the incident itself to the Title IX Coordinator being sure not to reveal to the Title IX Coordinator your name/identity, or compromise their own criminal investigation.

The University is required by the federal Clery Act to report certain types of crimes (including certain sex offenses) in statistical reports. However, while the University will report the type of incident in the annual crime statistics report known as the Annual Security Report, your name/identity will not be revealed.

Confidentiality when Reporting to the Title IX Coordinator and Other University Employees

Most University employees have a duty to report incidents of Sexual Violence when they are on notice of it. When you tell the Title IX Coordinator or another University employee about a Sexual Violence incident, you have the right to expect the University to take immediate and appropriate steps to investigate what happened and to resolve the matter promptly and equitably. In all cases, the University strongly encourages victims to report Sexual Violence directly to the Title IX Coordinator.

As detailed above in the Privileged and Confidential Communications section, all University employees exceptphysicians, licensed counselors, and sexual assault counselors and advocates, must report to the Title IX Coordinator all relevant details about any Sexual Violence incidents of which they become aware. The University will need to determine what happened – and will need to know the names of the victim(s) and the perpetrator(s), any witnesses, and any other relevant facts, including the date, time and specific location of the incident.

To the extent possible, information reported to the Title IX Coordinator or other University employees will be shared only with individuals responsible for handling the University’s response to the incident. The University will protect the privacy of individuals involved in a Sexual Violence incident except as otherwise required by law or University policy. A Sexual Violence report may result in the gathering of extremely sensitive information about individuals in the campus community. While such information is considered confidential, University policy regarding access to public records and disclosure of personal information may require disclosure of certain information concerning a report of Sexual Violence. In such cases, efforts will be made to redact the records, as appropriate, in order to protect the victim’s identity and privacy and the privacy of other involved individuals.

If you request of the Title IX Coordinator or another University employee that your identity remain completely confidential, the Title IX Coordinator will explain that the University cannot always honor that request and guarantee complete confidentiality. If you wish to remain confidential or request that no investigation be conducted or disciplinary action taken, the University must weigh that request against the University’s obligation to provide a safe, non- discriminatory environment for all students, employees and third parties, including you. Under those circumstances, the Title IX Coordinator will determine whether your request for complete confidentiality and/or no investigation can be honored under the facts and circumstances of the particular case, including whether the University has a legal obligation to report the incident, conduct an investigation or take other appropriate steps. Without information about your identity, the University’s ability to meaningfully investigate the incident and pursue disciplinary action against the perpetrator may be severely limited.

The Title IX Coordinator will inform you prior to starting an investigation and will, to the extent possible, only share information with people responsible for handling the University’s response. The Title IX Coordinator will remain mindful of your well-being, and will take ongoing steps to protect you from retaliation or harm, and work with you to create a safety plan. Retaliation against you, whether by students, or employees, will not be tolerated. The University and Title IX Coordinator will also: (1) Provide interim remedies requested by you, if they are reasonably available, regardless of whether you choose to report Sexual Violence to campus or local police; (2) Assist you in accessing other available victim advocacy, academic support, counseling, disability, medical/health or mental health services, and legal assistance both on and off campus; (3) Provide other security and support, which could include issuing a no-contact order, helping arrange a change of campus-based living or working arrangements or course schedules (including for the perpetrator pending the outcome of the investigation) or adjustments for assignments, tests, or work duties; and (4) Inform you of your right to report a crime to University or local police – and provide you with assistance if you wish to do so.

The University will not require you to participate in any investigation or disciplinary proceeding if you do not wish to participate. The University will not generally notify parents or legal guardians of your report of Sexual Violence unless you are under the age of 18 or you provide the University with written permission to do so.

Under California law, and pursuant to University policy, all University employees, including the Title IX Coordinator, are mandatory child abuse and neglect reporters and should explain to victims under 18 years of age that they are required to report the Sexual Violence incident to the police. However, the identity of the person who reports and the report itself are confidential and disclosed only among appropriate agencies.

Because the University is under a continuing legal obligation to address the issue of Sexual Violence campus-wide, reports of Sexual Violence (including non-identifying reports) may also prompt the University to consider broader remedial action – such as increased monitoring, supervision or security at locations where the reported incident occurred; increased education, training and prevention efforts, including to targeted population groups; conducting climate assessments/victimization surveys; and/or revision of policies and practices.

NOTE: If the University determines that the perpetrator poses a serious and immediate threat to the campus community, a designated Campus Security Authority under the Clery Act may be called upon to issue a timely warning to the community. Any such warning will not include any information that identifies the victim.

Available Services and Options for Victims of Sexual Violence

If you report being a victim of Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, or Stalking you will receive writtennotification about options for, and available assistance in, changing academic, living, transportation, and working situations, if requested and if such accommodations are reasonably available, regardless of whether you choose to report the crime to campus police or local law enforcement.

You will also receive written notification about existing counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal assistance, and other services available for victims, both on campus and in the community. Those services include:

Campus Services

Student Health Services (SHS)
Phone: (805) 437-8828
Email: Student.Health@csuci.edu
Weblink: http://www.csuci.edu/studenthealth/contact.htm

Personal Counseling Services (PCS)
Phone: (805) 437-2088
Email: pcs@csuci.edu
Web link: http://www.csuci.edu/pcs/

Multicultural and Women’s & Gender Student Center (MWGSC)
Phone: (805) 437-8407
Contact: Kirsten Moss-Frye
Phone: (805) 437-3156
Email: Kirsten.Moss@csuci.edu
Web link: http://www.csuci.edu/multicultural/index.htm

Off-Campus Services

St John's Pleasant Valley Hospital
Address: 2309 Antonio Avenue, Camarillo, CA 93010-1414
Phone: (805) 389-5800
Web link: http://www.stjohnshealth.org/index.htm

Family Health Center of Moorpark
Address: 612 Spring Road, Building A, Moorpark, CA
Phone: (805) 523-5400
Web link: N/A

Ventura County Crisis Intervention Team (CIT)
Phone: (805) 383-4806
Email: Ventura.CoCIT@ventura.org
Web link: http://www.venturacountycit.org/index.html

Adult Mobile Crisis Response Team (21 year and older)
Phone (24/7): 1-866-998-2243
Email: VCBHWeb@ventura.org
Web link: http://www.vchca.org/behavioral-health/mental-health---adult-services/adult-mobile-crisis-response-team

Coalition for Family Harmony (Rape Crisis Center)
Phone (24-hour Bilingual Hotline): 1-800-300-2181
Address: 1030 North Ventura Road, Oxnard, CA 93030
Web link: http://www.thecoalition.org/

Santa Barbara Rape Crisis Center
Phone (24-hour hotline): (805) 564-3696
Address: 433 E. Canon Perdido Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101
Web link: http://www.sbrapecrisiscenter.org/index.html

Interface: Children and Family Services: (805) 485-6114

Battered Women's Hotline: (805) 656-1111

Ventura County Victim Services: (805) 654-3622

Additional Resources

Know Your Rights about Title IX
http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/title-ix-rights-201104.html

California Coalition Against Sexual Assault
1215 K. Street, Suite 1850
Sacramento, CA 95814
(916) 446-2520
http://calcasa.org/

U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights:
(800) 421-3481 or ocr@ed.gov

If you wish to fill out a complaint form online with the OCR, you may do so at: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/complaintintro.html

The White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault: https://www.notalone.gov/

National Rape Hotline
(800) 656-4673

National Domestic Violence Hotline
(800) 656-4673

Sex Offender Registration

Effective October 28, 2002, Penal Code 290.02 was expanded and requires sexual offenders to register with the University Police Department. Convicted sexual offenders are required to register under Section 290 if they are residing on the University campus; enrolled as a student of the University; employed by the University, either full-time or part-time (includes paid employees or volunteers); or working or carrying on a vocation at the University (e.g. contractors) for more than 14 days or for an aggregate period exceeding 30 days in a calendar year (including paid workers as well as volunteers).

Persons listed above must register with the CI Police Department within five (5) working days of commencing enrollment or employment with the University. Registrants are also required to notify the CI Police Department within five (5) working days of ceasing to be enrolled or employed, or ceasing to carry on a vocation at the University. Public information regarding sex offenders in California may be obtained by viewing the Department of Justice Online Megan's Law Website at www.meganslaw.ca.gov .

Emergency Response, Notification and Evacuation Procedures

University Police officials are responsible for managing CI’s all-hazards Emergency Operations Plan (EOP). The EOP includes information about emergency response, notification and evacuation/shelter-in-place protocols. Individual campus departments are responsible for contingency plans and continuity of operations plans for their staff and areas of responsibility. The EOP can be viewed at http://www.csuci.edu/publicsafety/emergency-management/index.htm. CI conducts a number of emergency response exercises each year, to include tests of the emergency notification system. These tests are designed to assess and evaluate the emergency plans and capabilities of the institution.

Students and others should notify CI Police of any situation or incident on campus that involves a significant emergency or dangerous situation that may involve an immediate or ongoing threat to the health and safety of persons on campus. CI Police officials have received training in Incident Command and it is their responsibility to respond to, mitigate, investigate, and document any situation that may cause a significant emergency or dangerous situation. Depending on the nature of the incident, other CI departments and other local, state or federal agencies could also be involved in responding to the incident.

In addition, the CI Police has a responsibility to determine if incidents do in fact, pose an immediate threat to the community. If so, federal Law requires that CI immediately notify the campus community or the appropriate segments of the community that may be affected by the situation. In the event an immediate notification is required CI Police officials – without delay - will determine the content and extent of the notification and utilize some or all of the following methods of communication to broadcast the notification: (1) e-mail; (2) CI Alert; (3) CI web site; (4) signage; (5) IP telephone and outdoor loudspeakers; and (6) radio and/or other media.

CI will post updates during a critical incident on the CI Web site at www.csuci.edu. Individuals can call CI recorded emergency updates/information telephone line at 805-437-3911.

Testing Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures

An evacuation drill is coordinated by CI Police each year for all buildings on the Main Campus. Students and others are made aware of the emergency exits in the buildings and are provided guidance about the direction they should travel when exiting each building for a short –term building evacuation. CI Police does not tell students or others in advance about the designated locations for long-term evacuations because those decisions are affected by time of day, location of the building being evacuated, the availability of the various designated emergency gathering locations on campus, and other factors such as the location and nature of the threat. In all cases, CI Police and Building Marshals will communicate information to students and others regarding the developing situation or any evacuation status changes.

The purpose of evacuation drills is to prepare building occupants for an organized evacuation in case of an emergency. AT CI, evacuation drills are used as a way to educate and train occupants on issues specific to their building. During the drill, occupants ‘practice’ drill procedures and familiarize themselves with the location of exits and the sound of the fire alarm. In addition to educating the occupants of each building about the evacuation procedures during the drills, the process also provides the university an opportunity to test the operation of fire alarm system components.

Evacuation drills are monitored by CI officials to evaluate egress and behavioral patterns. Reports are prepared by participating departments which identify deficient equipment so that repairs can be made immediately. Recommendations for improvements are also submitted to the appropriate departments for consideration.

Residential students receive information about evacuation and shelter-in-place procedures during their housing orientation and during other educational sessions that they can participate in throughout the year. The Housing and Residential Education staff members are trained in these procedures as well and act as an on-going resource for the residential students.

CI Police conduct several announced and unannounced drills and exercises each year and conducts follow-through activities designed for assessment and evaluation of emergency plans and capabilities. CI Police publishes a summary of its emergency response and evacuation procedures in conjunction with at least one drill or exercise each calendar year.

Shelter in Place Procedures

If an incident occurs and the areas outside a building become unsafe it is usually safer to stay indoors, because leaving the area may expose the student and others to danger. Thus, to “shelter-in-place” means to make a shelter of the building that a student or other is occupying, until it is safe to go outside. A shelter-in-place notification may come from several sources, including the CI Police, Housing staff or others. If a shelter order is given: (1) stay inside; (2) locate an interior room without windows or minimum windows; (3) shut/lock all doors and windows if possible; (4) turn off air/heat; (5) close vents; (6) make a list of sheltered persons; (7) call CI Police and alert them to your location.

Missing Student Procedures and Notification

If a member of the CI community has reason to believe that a student – who resides in on-campus housing – is missing, s/he should immediately notify the CI Police Department at 805-437-8444. CI police officers will immediately initiate a missing person investigation and document all their findings.

Students residing in on-campus housing have the option to register one or more individuals to be a contact strictly for missing persons purposes. The contact can be anyone. Students have this option even if they have already identified a general emergency contact. This contact information is registered confidentially and is accessible only to authorized campus officials. It will not be disclosed, except to law enforcement personnel in furtherance of a missing person investigation. In the event the student is determined missing a campus official shall notify the students missing persons contact(s) within 24 hours of the determination. If the student is under 18 years of age and not emancipated, a campus official will notify a custodial parent or guardian within 24 hours of the determination that the student is missing, in addition to notifying any additional contact person designated by the student.

Fire Safety Disclosures

Fire safety regulations, for the purposes of this report, focus exclusively on on-campus student housing facilities. CI is required to: (1) maintain a log of all reported fires that occur in on-campus student housing facilities; (2) publish an annual fire safety report that contains fire safety policies and fire statistics for each of those facilities; and (3) submit fire statistics to the federal Department of Education.

Fire Safety Systems

Fire Safety Systems in the three on-campus student housing facilities - Anacapa Village, Santa Cruz Village and the Town Center – include: (1) fire alarm monitoring; (2) sprinkler systems; (3) smoke/heat detectors; (4) fire alarm pull stations (5) fire extinguishers; (6) evacuation plans displayed; (7) fire/evacuation drill each calendar year; and (8) emergency telephones.

Fire Drills

One fire drill – defined as a supervised practice of a mandatory evacuation of a building for a fire – was conducted in each housing facility during the 2013 calendar year.

Policies or Rules on Portable Electric Appliances, Smoking and Open Flames

Cooking and/or cooking equipment such as toaster ovens, electric grills, etc. are to be stored and used in designated kitchen areas of Anacapa, and G building common area kitchens. Cooking in Santa Cruz bedrooms or suite areas, and Anacapa and Town Center bedrooms or living rooms is not allowed.

Heated elements which could be left unattended for long periods of time and require heat to release scent are prohibited. Open-coiled electric or heating appliances such as space heaters and sun lamps are prohibited. All allowed ‘heat source’ equipment, such as curling/flat irons, glue guns, irons, etc. must be attended to at all times. Leaving equipment on while unattended is a serious fire risk. Halogen lamps and neon lights are prohibited. Extension cords and power strips/surge protectors must have a UL rating. “Piggy-backing” power strips are prohibited.

Candles, incense and/or any type of open flame within or adjacent to any student housing facility is prohibited. Candles, for any purpose, are prohibited.

Smoking anywhere inside a student housing facility is prohibited. Smoking is permitted outside, no less than 50 feet from any building or structure. Proper disposal of cigarette butts in provided receptacles is required. Electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) or other vapor type smoking devices are prohibited in student housing.

Student Housing Evacuation Procedures

In the event a fire alarm sounds students and others must: (1) remain calm; (2) leave the building at once using the nearest visibly safe stairway exit – do not return to your room first – never use an elevator when the fire alarm is sounding; (3) go directly to the nearest official gathering spot for your facility; (4) do not return to the building until given the all clear signal by a CI official, even if the alarm stops sounding.

Fire Safety Education and Training Programs

Fire Safety education information for all students living in on-campus housing, and all employees that have any association with on-campus student housing, is provided in the Resident’s ABC Manual.

Fire Safety education signs are periodically displayed throughout the various facilities. Sign topics include: (1) evacuation procedures; (2) how to use a fire extinguisher; (3) prohibited items; (4) smoking rules; and (5) steps to take when a fire is reported.

Reporting Extinguished Fires

Any fire that occurs in an on-campus student housing facility, regardless of size, that has been extinguished, must be reported immediately reported to Housing’s Main Office at 805-437-2733 and to University Police at 805-437-8444.

Future Improvements in Fire Safety

CI has adopted the National Incident Management System for all of its emergency events. The adoption of NIMS requires after action corrective reports be completed in order to assess response procedures and identify possible improvements that can be implemented for future events.

crime stats 2011-2013

Thousansd Oaks Campus Crime Stats 2011-2013

Golita campus Crime stats 2011-2013

Fire stats 2011-2013